BPO Completion, Barbados

Well, the Blue Planet Odyssey is done. Tonight we had our completion/celebration with Jimmy Cornell (and his wife Gwenda, and a dozen or so boats in his Caribbean Odyssey that just arrived from the Canary Islands). We came away with Mount Gay Rum hats, and a brand new BPO flag (our old one is in tatters). It was fun to drink rum punches and talk with some of the other sailors. But it hit me when Carol (on Maggie) said: If we don’t see you again… Yikes! It’s hard to imagine not rendezvousing again with Maggie and Tahawus. We’ve sailed around the world together!! Oh well, we will stay in touch, but it is a sad thought that after all we’ve been through we are sailing our separate ways. I’m feeling sad about the other friends we made along the way, too — the many crews who turned back or wanted to stay in the South Pacific or had health issues or shipped their boat home or…whatever. We had a bond, and I wish they (and Luc and Jackie!) could have been here to acknowledge the completion and swap tales.

Tomorrow we depart for Grenada. Of course I will be very happy to be sailing again. Twelve days here has been a bit long. Tim and Josh changed their flights and left as quickly as they could. Tim says his knee is healing well. Josh got to fly home on his birthday, which was important to him, plus he got to attend his son’s basketball game (also important to him, and something that used to be an important factor to me).

I remained in the downtown Careenage, partly because it is convenient to have electricity and water available; partly because it makes it easier for my three new crew (Bill, Nora and Bill’s friend Harry) to come and go as they please. They haven’t “gone” much, except to a tour/tasting at the Mount Gay distillery. We’ve done some satisfying work on the boat, fixing various things that have gone bad over the past months.

I arranged an island tour for myself and the other two crews. It was pretty bad. We asked for a history lesson, but our two drivers didn’t really know the history, plus one spoke with such an accent that it was extremely difficult to understand her. And many of the places they took us had additional admission fees, which I had not expected. The people here are friendly and the area seems pretty safe, but I can’t say that the island itself is very notable. It’s all about servicing the tourists from the huge cruise ships, and second homes for rich people. One of the things I enjoyed most was going to a cricket match ($5). Barbados crushed Guyana, although I only watched Barbados bat, because I’d had enough after two hours.

We are cleared out. We are pretty well stocked (lots more marlin even after giving hunks away to the other boats). We have a destination in mind (an overnight sail away). The bridge is scheduled to open at noon to let us out. Time to start island hopping in the gorgeous Caribbean.

Cricket match at Kensington Oval
Cricket match at Kensington Oval
Tahawus joins us in the Careenage
Tahawus joins us in the Careenage
For catamarans like us it is challenging getting through the bridge into and out of the Careenage.
For catamarans like us it is challenging getting through the bridge into and out of the Careenage.

img_9698

Oldest church in Barbados; start of our island tour.
Oldest church in Barbados; start of our island tour.

img_9612

An unfortunately large part of the tour was about where the multitude of rich and famous live or visit. And checking out their yachts...
An unfortunately large part of the tour was about where the multitude of rich and famous live or visit. And checking out their yachts…
East coast of the island is pretty
East coast of the island is pretty
North end, too.
North end, too.
Exploring a sea cave
Exploring a sea cave

img_9641

img_9635

Bathsheba, east coast
Bathsheba, east coast

img_9650

img_9659

Back in Bridgetown, this is the "Screw Dock" -- Victorian era technology for lifting a big ship out of the water to work on the bottom.
Back in Bridgetown, this is the “Screw Dock” — Victorian era technology for lifting a big ship out of the water to work on the bottom.

And finally we have the completion/celebration/farewell party for the Blue Planet Odyssey. Lots of rum punch (with not much food…) at the Yacht Club, a pleasant mile walk along a beautiful beach. A little more about it on the Cornell Sailing web site: http://cornellsailing.com/2017/02/blue-planet-odyssey-comes-to-a-successful-end-in-barbados/

Collecting that coveted Mount Gay cap and Aventura shirt.
Collecting that coveted Mount Gay cap and Aventura shirt.
The three BPO crews. No Tim at the party, unfortunately, but including Bill and Nora.
The three BPO crews. No Tim at the party, unfortunately, but including Bill and Nora.

8 thoughts on “BPO Completion, Barbados”

  1. In some ways it seems like it was just a few months ago that you left; in others it feels like you have been gone a very long time (like a couple of years almost!). In the end, though, it seems rather odd after reading your amazing posts that it is over. Well… not all the sailing but the BP Rally. It certainly has been an adventure. I hope it met and, maybe even exceeded, your expectations. Tom used to say about sailing it was mostly about long stretches of relative boredom, punctuated by periods of sheer terror. You, of course, also got a world of cultural exchanges which was often truly astonishing. It will be wonderful to have you back home again in a little while but, oh my, what a change for you!

    Like

  2. Zeke, I can’t believe this is the end! Your journey has been mesmerizing and I’ve truly enjoyed reading every minute of it. Maybe after you’re stateside in the NE again, it will be time for another CoMed reunion where we can listen to some stories in person. Congratulations on such a dramatic feat.
    Darryl

    Like

  3. Congratulations Zeke. I’ve followed your blog since we parted company in Bora Bora and entitled your adventure. I’m on the East Coast quite a bit and look forward to catching up at some point in the future.
    Drop me a line some time. Terry&Dena

    Like

  4. It really saddens me to think that this wonderful journey has to end!!! You have taken me on an amazing trip around the world to see places I can only dream of seeing! I hope your posts will continue! Thank you so much for sharing this with me….I wish we could have kept the group from Lewiston Middle School on board……do you suppose the sharks got them???

    Like

  5. Like Zeke, Patricia, and others, I felt sad reading about the end. I’ve been with No Regrets every step of the way- breakdowns, storms, bureaucracy, personal feuds, glorious sailing, companionship, welcoming parties, and all. I learned a little geography, a little about other cultures, and connected with people whose countries are at risk from sea level rise. Of course we all knew it would end one day, but it’s still a bit of a shock to read “that after all we’ve been through we are sailing our separate ways.”

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s