Galapagos Wildlife

First glimpse of Galapagos tortoise.
First glimpse of Galapagos tortoise.

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These photos are from a breeding center, where they protect the young for 10 years, until their shells will protect them, and then release to the wild.  The male here is doing his part, though the female seemed to be uninterested...
These photos are from a breeding center, where they protect the young for 10 years, until their shells will protect them, and then release to the wild. The male here is doing his part, though the female seemed to be uninterested…

We went to a beach where I swam with a large sea turtle.  The water was only 4 or 5 feet deep.  The turtle ignored my presence just a couple of feet away, as it dove to feed on the bottom, and surfaced to breathe.  I don’t do underwater photos, though, so no images for y’all of the turtle.  But there were iguanas and, of course, sea lions…

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The usual view of a frigate bird, soaring high.
The usual view of a frigate bird, soaring high.
But if you climb up to their level...
But if you climb up to their level…

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In Spanish they are called "scissors bird" because of the way they use their tail feathers.
In Spanish they are called “scissors bird” because of the way they use their tail feathers.
Blue-footed booby, unique to the Galapagos.  This is my one photo (so far) where you can zoom in and see the feet.
Blue-footed booby, unique to the Galapagos. This is my one photo (so far) where you can zoom in and see the feet.

The Galapagos are famous for their finches, which were one of the species (actually they evolved into 13 species on the islands) that got Darwin thinking about why/how they had developed different beaks (adapting to the foods they were eating).  Also I find it rather amazing that a mating pair of finches somehow made it to these islands in the first place.  Recent “invasive species” aside, only animals that were blown 700 miles off course, or that could live for a long time drifting (perhaps on a downed tree) across in the current, live here.  Tortoises yes (they can go a long time without fresh water), frogs no (amphibians cannot last long without fresh water), for example.

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2 thoughts on “Galapagos Wildlife”

  1. Hi, Zeke. I don’t follow any blogs to speak of, but I want you to know how much I enjoy your posts and so pleased about your connection with Lewiston Middle School. Thank you.

    Like

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